Does Bench Press Work Lats? What experts have to say!


When it comes to working the lats, many people automatically think of doing chin-ups or pull-ups. But does the bench press really work the lats? The answer might surprise you! In this blog post, we will take a look at the muscles worked during a bench press and see how they compare to the lats. We will also discuss some tips on how to maximize lat activation during a bench press. Stay tuned!

Lat Anatomy (Overview)

Does Bench Press Work Lats

The latissimus dorsi, more commonly known as the lats, are large muscle group that extends from the lower back all the way up to the shoulder. The lats are responsible for several key functions, including:

  • Pulling the arms down (as in a chin-up or pull-down)
  • Adducting the arms (bringing them toward the body)
  • Extending the spine

As you can see, the lats are involved in a lot of different movements. This is why many people believe that the bench press does work the lats. However, let’s take a closer look at how the muscles work during a bench press to see if this is really the case.

Muscles Worked During a Bench Press

There are three main muscles worked during a bench press:

  • pectoralis major
  • anterior deltoid
  • triceps brachii.

The pectoralis major is a large muscle that covers the chest and helps to move the arm across the body. The anterior deltoid is located in the front of the shoulder and helps to raise the arm up in front of the body. The triceps brachii is located in the back of the upper arm and helps to extend the elbow.

Note: None of these muscles are directly responsible for moving the arms down or for adducting the arms.

So, does this mean that the bench press does not work the lats? Not necessarily Remember, the lats are responsible for extending the spine. This means that they are indirectly involved in the bench press movement. However, they are not directly worked as they would be during a chin-up or pull-down.

For more articles on Bench Press please click here

Tips for Maximizing Lat Activation During a Bench Press

There are a few things you can do to help ensure that your lats are activated during a bench press:

  • Use a wider grip: A wider grip will help to place more emphasis on the lats.
  • Use an overhand grip: An overhand grip (palms facing down) will also help to place more emphasis on the lats.
  • Use a pronated grip: A pronated grip (palms facing away from the body) will help to further increase lat activation.

Other Exercise that works Lats

In addition to the tips above, there are a few other exercises that can help you work your lats:

  • Chin-ups and pull-ups: These are the classic lat exercises. They directly target the lats and help to build strength and muscle mass.
  • Rows: Rows are a great exercise for working the lats, as well as the other muscles in the back.
  • Lat pull-downs: This exercise can be done with a machine or with a resistance band. It is a great way to work the lats without putting too much strain on the elbows or shoulders.

Final Thoughts

The bench press does work the lats, but not directly. The lats are indirectly involved in the bench press movement, but they are not the primary focus of the exercise. There are other exercises that are better suited for working the lats, such as chin-ups, pull-downs, and rows.

However, if you want to maximize lat activation during a bench press, be sure to use a wider grip, an overhand grip, and a pronated grip.

Do you have any tips for working the lats? Share them in the comments below! And be sure to check back soon for more great blog posts on all things fitness!

Reference

Anatomy, Back, Latissimus Dorsi – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Latissimus Dorsi Muscle – kenhub.com

Latissimus dorsi muscle – Wikipedia

David Y Johnson

David Y. Johnson was born and raised in a small town in upstate New York. After graduating from college, he worked as a research pharmacist at a major pharmaceutical company. There, he developed a keen interest in medical research and pharmacy practice. He later moved to Philadelphia, where he worked as a clinical development scientist for a smaller pharmaceutical company. In this role, David was responsible for developing new drug formulations and conducting clinical trials. He has over 7 years of experience working in the pharmaceutical industry, making him an invaluable asset to any development team.

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